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Mustard and Cheddar macaroni cheese

June 16, 2019

I have a obsession passion for finding out about ingredients, how they’re made, where they come from, the story behind them. This time last year I went in search of everything about dates, this is part of a series on mustard.

I’m sure we all have our own version of this – and our own names too. I’m firmly in the ‘macaroni cheese’ camp and wince at ‘Mac n cheese’ (sounds like fast food) or macaroni and cheese (sounds inaccurate). I’m sure Americans wince at my title for one of their national dishes, but whatever you call it, the satisfying comforting nature is indisputable.

I cook this at least once a fortnight. The method is simple but many people seem to be scared of making homemade béchamel sauce – that’s a white sauce made with butter, flour and milk – and I’m not sure why. Risk of lumpiness or put off by the sound of it being too complicated or taking too long?

There are simple tips below to avoid or even rescue lumpiness. And I do believe that it is the ultimate quick to prepare comfort food. You can definitely get it on the table in less that half an hour.

You can play with the basic recipe by adding different cheeses, adding other ingredients from seafood to chillies, topping with breadcrumbs or nuts, and there are different methods to cooking it – some people choose to use the hob only dispensing with the oven or grill although you don’t get the lovely bubbling cheesy top this way.

This version has a touch of luxury with a few spoonfuls or cream (or local labneh) and a little grape juice (with or without alcohol) that goes beautifully with the Dijon mustard.

I cook from scratch so don’t have many bottles or jars in my cupboards, just the ones that count as simple ingredients. Maille is always in my fridge, both original and wholegrain, for the taste and the Dijon is a lovely silky texture. Plus, importantly, the mustard is made traditionally and the mustard seeds are GMO free.

Two bowls of mustard macaroni cheese with a serving spoon

About Maille mustard

Maille was founded in 1747 by Antoine Claude Maille who originally made vinegars, which is one of the basics of good mustard;. I love imagining all the things that have been witnessed while the vinegars and mustards were being steeped and stirred – three monarchies, the French revolution, two empires, five republics, five European wars and two World wars. The initial success of the company was by becoming the official mustard and vinegar purveyor to Louis XV and then to many of the Royal Courts across Europe.

The products were always made in Dijon, Burgundy, although by the 1970s, mustard growing had almost died out. Maille formed cooperatives with farmers and this led to a resurgance in the region and they now buy the majority of the mustard grown there combined with GMO-free grains from Canada.

The piquant flavour and smooth texture is because they steep the whole mustard seeds with white vinegar and then cut them (rather than the usual method of crushing them).

Variations

I managed to persuade my friend’s daughter, who is an incredibly fussy-eater, to try some of this the other day (always easier when you’re not their Mother). I thought the intense cheesy, mustardy flavours might be too much for her but she took a bowlful home and polished it off.

I like petit-pois on the side. Some people stir them into the pasta and sauce before grilling or putting in the oven but I like the fresh greeness of just cooked frozen ones or, ideally, freshly podded ones (which I can eat raw). KP insists on sliced tomatoes on top which I can’t abide, so I just put them on half of it which keeps us both happy.

While the traditional pasta shape is the elbow macaroni which is quite small, I like a bigger tube so the sauce really coats every bit of it. This is usually what I fancy when out shopping, so could be penne, amori or elicoidali.

Two bowls of mustard macaroni cheese with a serving spoon

Mustard Macaroni Cheese

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Rich with cheese, mustard and a touch of cream - a simple, comforting recipe that everyone loves.

Ingredients

250g macaroni or other tubular pasta

50g unsalted butter

50g plain white flour

720ml milk

150ml white grape juice or white wine

1 -2 tablespoons of Maille Dijon mustard

225g strong Cheddar cheese, grated

2 tablespoons of cream or labneh

Finely chopped chives (optional)

Directions

  1. Bring a large pan of salted water to the boil and cook the pasta until it’s al dente (not too soft)
  2. Meanwhile, melt the butter in a saucepan, stir in the flour and cook, stirring, for about a minute. Remove from the heat and add the milk a little at a time, stirring vigorously with a whisk until it’s all combined. Do the same with the grape juice. Return to the heat and bring to the boil, stirring continuously until the sauce thickens.
  3. Lower the heat, season with black pepper and a little salt and stir in the mustard,  about 170g (3/4) of the cheese and the cream or labneh.
  4. Drain the pasta well and add to the sauce, mixing it in well with a large spoon. Taste and add more mustard if necessary. Tip or spoon the mixture into a large ovenproof dish.
  5. Sprinkle the remaining cheese over the top and place under a pre-heated grill until it starts to bubble and the top is golden brown. Sprinkle with the chives if you want a touch of green and serve right away.

Notes: If you don’t want to use cream, or grape juice replace it with the same amount of milk. If you want to make this ahead of time, prepare it up until the end of stage 4 and put in the fridge if necessary. Sprinkle with the remaining cheese and bake in the oven (200C 180C fan) for 25-30 minutes.

Two bowls of mustard macaroni cheese with two jars of Maille mustard

Tips on making a smooth white sauce.

  1. To make the roux (butter and flour paste), add the flour as soon as the butter has melted and whisk to make a paste. Cook on a low heat for about a minute so you don’t get a floury taste.
  2. Don’t stop stirring, especially when it’s on the heat. I use a wire whisk throughout but you could use a wooden spoon too.
  3. At the beginning, add the liquid just a tablespoon at a time and stir like mad. It’s easier to get a thick sauce smooth than a thin one. At first it will look clumpy but keep stirring a splashing in little bits of milk at a time and whisking vigorously. It’s great to tone your upper arms muscles.
  4. When all the liquid has been added, bring to a simmer (while stirring) until it thickens to a silky, smooth sauce that can be used for so many classic recipes.
  5. If you do get distracted from your stirring and end up with some lumps, you can blitz with a blender. You can make the whole thing in a Vitamix (google for the recipe) but I think it lacks the texture of the pan-made one.

This recipe was commissioned by Maille, and, as I have always used their mustard, this was a pleasure. I only write about things that I genuinely cook with or endorse.  All opinions my own.  

Two bowls of mustard macaroni cheese with a serving spoon

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18 Comments leave one →
  1. Taylor Kiser permalink
    June 17, 2019 6:49 pm

    This is ultimate comfort food! Can’t wait to make your version!

  2. Demeter permalink
    June 17, 2019 7:13 pm

    This looks like perfect comfort food! So creamy!!

  3. Denise Zacharia Wright permalink
    June 17, 2019 7:50 pm

    Wow – that is an amazing looking mac and cheese. I think I would really like the mustard flavor in it.

    • July 3, 2019 7:12 pm

      It’s quite subtle and adds a warming pepperiness.

  4. June 17, 2019 7:52 pm

    I am loving this recipe…my kids will love it!

  5. June 17, 2019 8:24 pm

    Maille is always in my macaroni cheese. I’ve tried supermarket own-brand but I always come back. And they have tons of varieties. Btw, I had to really stop myself from typing mac n cheese! Looks really gorgeous – and super comforting. 🙂

  6. June 17, 2019 9:02 pm

    Love this idea of using Maille Mustard in pasta!

  7. June 18, 2019 11:00 pm

    That looks soooo good!

  8. June 23, 2019 12:40 pm

    Maille make great mustard. And you make great macaroni cheese by the look of it. Drooling.

    • July 3, 2019 7:09 pm

      Thanks so much. What do you use your Maille mustard for the most?

      • July 3, 2019 7:33 pm

        I use it in everything from vinaigrette to barbecue spare ribs, cauliflower and macaroni cheese, quiche, dips…. I love the kick it gives. X

      • July 7, 2019 5:07 pm

        Lots of ideas here. Quiche…. mmmmmm

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